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An introduction to Beechcraft models


Introduction

Most of the aircraft discussed in this article are described in more detail in separate articles.

Background

After working for the Swallow Airplane Manufacturing Company, Walter Hershel Beech established the Travel Air Manufacturing Company in Wichita in 1924. He and his group of people initially set up shop in a leased portion of an old planing-mill building. Later the company moved its activities to other premises.

The birth of the Beech Aircraft Company and first design

WH Beech and Olive Ann Beech created the Beech Aircraft Company in Wichita in April 1932. WH Beech and his personnel worked in a Wichita factory and their aim was to design and build a biplane with five seats and a closed cabin. It was to have a top speed of 200 miles an hour (320 kilometres an hour) and a range of close to 1 000 miles (1 600 kilometres) without stopping. The aircraft was to be well appointed and comfortable. The Beechcraft Model 17 made its maiden flight on 4 November 1932.


This is what the Model 17 looks like. (See the separate article for more images and details about the aircraft.)

Model 18

The second design (the twin-engine Model 18), which would for many years be known as the “Twin Beech”, made its first flight on 15 January 1937. The Beechcraft Model 18 was in production from 1937 to 1969.

Former Travel Air Company factory and aerodrome

Early in 1934 Beech Aircraft had become a full aircraft manufacturer and the company was moved back to the former Travel Air Company factory and aerodrome six miles (9,6 kilometres) east of downtown Wichita. This factory resumed production on 23 April 1934.

The Second World War (1939 to 1945)

During the Second World War Beechcrafts were used in new roles. In late-1940 military orders commenced and all commercial production was stopped. Model 18s were used as bomber and gunnery trainers and Model 17s as fast transports for personnel. The advanced pilot trainer, the Model 25/26 AT-10 Wichita, strongly resembled the Beechcraft Model 18 but it was an entirely new design.

1945 to 1947

After the Second World War, Walter H Beech put the emphasis on refining the Model 17 and Model 18. Only two months after the Japanese surrendered, the first postwar commercial Beechcraft, an eight-seat deluxe executive version of the military C-45, was ready for flight tests. This new model, known as the D18S, had a 20 percent increase in gross weight, as well as an increase in range and payload.

In addition, a new product was introduced in the form of the Model 35 Bonanza. This was an all-metal aircraft with four seats. The new design proved to be very popular in that more than 500 orders were placed before any detailed information about its performance had been released and nearly 1 000 were delivered during a period of eight months in 1947.

Model 45

The Beechcraft Model 45 Mentor, a single-engine trainer, took to the air for the first time on 2 December 1948.

Model 50 Twin Bonanza

In July 1949 the Beech Aircraft Company announced the first postwar twin business aircraft, which was intended to complement the Model 18 already being produced. The Beechcraft Model 50, named Twin Bonanza, had its first flight on 15 November 1949.

Facilities at Liberal

In 1951 Beech leased facilities at Liberal in Kansas to enlarge manufacturing space. In 1963 production of the Musketeer was assigned to Liberal.

Models E18S and E18S-9700 Super 18

Early in 1954 the redesigned Super 18 (Model E18S) was introduced. It had a higher and longer cabin, the cockpit had a new layout and the plane had a new undercarriage and an airstair door. A variant was the Model E18S-9700.


This is a Model E18S.


Illustrated in this image is a Model E18S-9700.

Model 95 Travel Air

In 1956 a new aircraft, the twin-engine Model 95 Travel Air, was added to the growing line of aircraft offered by Beechcraft. The Model 95 was designed to fill the gap that existed between the single-engine Model 35 Bonanza and the much larger Model 50 Twin Bonanza.

Model 65 and Model 33

In 1958 the Model 65 Queen Air and in 1959 the Model 33 Debonair were added to the Beechcraft range of products.
The Model 65 was a direct development of the successful Model 50 Twin Bonanza. The Queen Air first flew in prototype form on 28 August 1958.

Model 65-80

First flown on 25 August 1961, the Model 65-80 Queen Air was officially announced in March 1962.


A Model 65-80 Queen Air is depicted in this photograph.

Model D50E Twin Bonanza

Available from 1961, the Model D50E was fitted with two Lycoming GO-480-G2F6 engines, with 295 horsepower at 3 400 rpm available at takeoff and a normal rating of 285 horsepower at 3 100 rpm.


Here a Model D50E Twin Bonanza is shown.

Model D95A Travel Air

Introduced in 1963, the Model D95A had a redesigned and larger forward luggage compartment in a more tapered nose section, housing virtually all the radio equipment. Engines were now two 180-horsepower Lycoming IO-360-B1Bs, driving six-foot-diameter (1,83-metre-diameter) Hartzell Type 8447-12 propellers.


Illustrated here is a Model D95A Travel Air.

Model 23 Musketeer

Beech made its entry into the light-aircraft market in 1963 with the Model 23 Musketeer. Production totaled 553 aircraft. The improved Model A23 Musketeer II was introduced in June 1964. Production totaled 346 units, all built in 1965.


ZS-ECE is a Model A23 Musketeer II.

Announcement of the King Air

On 14 July 1963 Beech announced that a new pressurised six-/eight-seat business aircraft powered by two United Aircraft of Canada (UACL) PT6 propeller turbines had been developed. Construction of the prototype of the Model 65-90 King Air began during the summer of 1963. This was Beechcraft’s most sophisticated machine to date.

Model 60 Duke

Early in 1965 Beech began design work on an elegant four-to-six-seat pressurised and turbosupercharged transport aircraft, known as the Model 60. Construction of the prototype of this aircraft began in January 1966 and the maiden flight was made on 29 December 1966.

Model A23 Musketeer III

In October 1965, with the introduction of the Musketeer III, Beech announced a range of three Musketeer variants known as Custom, Sport and Super R that were given individual exterior paint schemes.

Model A23-24 Super III


Depicted in this image is Model A23-24 Musketeer Super III ZS-EUM. This model first flew on 19 November 1965.

Total number of models available in 1965

In 1965 the total number of available Beechcraft models was boosted to 15. This number included the pressurised Model 88 Queen Air, the turbocharged Model V35 TC Bonanza and the initial delivery of the Queen Airliner to Commuter Airlines of Chicago.

Model 56 TC

1966 saw the first flight of the Model 56 TC Turbo Baron.

Models in production during the period 1968 to 1969 (as reflected in Jane’s 1968-69)

From 1968 to 1969 the following models were in production:

Model H18 Super H18; Musketeer Custom III, Sport III and Super III; Models V35A and V35A TC Bonanza; Models E33, E33A, E33B and E33C Bonanza; Model 36 Bonanza; Model E95 Travel Air; Models B55 and D55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A); Model 56 TC Turbo Baron; Model 60 Duke; Model A65 Queen Air (US Army designation U-8F Seminole); Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner; Model U-21A; Model 88 Queen Air; Model B90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6A); and Model 99.


The Model V35A Bonanza (illustrated) and the Model V35A TC Bonanza are four-/six-seat light cabin monoplanes with cantilever low wings. (A cantilever wing is one without any external bracing and monoplane means an aircraft with one set of wings.) The Model V35As have “butterfly” tails.


The Model E33, E33A, E33B and E33C Bonanzas are four-to-five-seat single-engine executive aircraft, similar in general configuration to the rest of the Bonanza line, but they are distinguished by a conventional tail unit with swept-back vertical surfaces. The Model E33 (illustrated) has a 225-horsepower Continental IO-470-K engine.


This image is an illustration of the Model 36 Bonanza. It is a six-seat/utility light cabin monoplane. The tail unit is a conventional cantilever all-metal stressed-skin structure.


Illustrated here is a Model 65-B80 Queen Air. The Queen Air 65-B80 is a six-/11-seat business aircraft and commuter airliner. It is powered by two 380-horsepower Lycoming IGSO-540-AID six-cylinder horizontally opposed air-cooled geared and supercharged engines.


The Model 65-88 Queen Air, a pressurised high-altitude version of the Queen Air, was introduced in August 1965. Certain structural changes necessary to cater for pressurisation, including the use of circular cabin windows, distinguish it from the Queen Air B80. (See the square windows of the Queen Air B80 in the previous image.)


The Model 65-B90 King Air is a pressurised seven-/10-seat cantilever low-wing business aircraft. Its power plants are two 550-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney PT6A-20 turboprop engines. The fuselage is an aluminium alloy semimonocoque structure. (The term monocoque means a hollow structure without internal bracing and in the sense in which it is used in aviation it is usually applied to a fuselage that is hollow and has only the minimum of stiffening.)

Models in production during the period 1970 to 1971 (as reflected in Jane’s 1970-71)

From 1970 to 1971 the following models were in production:

Model H18 Super H18; Musketeer Custom, Sport, Super and Super R; Models V35B and V35B TC Bonanza; Models F33, F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Models B55 and E55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A); Model A56 TC Turbo Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model A60 Duke; Model A65 Queen Air (US Army designation U-8F Seminole); Model 70 Queen Air and Queen Airliner 70; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model 65-A90-1 King Air (US Army designation U-21A); Model B90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6A); Model 99; and Model 100 King Air.


The Model F33, F33A and F33C Bonanzas are four-to-five-seat single-engine executive aircraft, similar in general configuration to the rest of the Bonanza line, but they are distinguished by a conventional tail unit with swept-back vertical surfaces. The Model F33A Bonanza (illustrated) has a 285-horsepower Continental IO-520-B engine.


This is a Model A60 Duke. The Duke A60 is a four-/six-seat pressurised and cabin monoplane and has cantilever low wings. The fuselage is a semimonocoque aluminium alloy structure and the power plants are two 380-horsepower Lycoming TIO-541-E1A4 six-cylinder horizontally opposed air-cooled turbosupercharged engines.

The Model B55 and E55 Barons are four-, five- or six-seat cabin monoplanes with cantilever low wings. Their fuselages are of a semimonocoque aluminium alloy structure [the nose of the E55 is extended by 11,6 inches (0,29 metres)] and tail units comprise a cantilever all-metal structure (there are two trim tabs in the elevators and one in the rudder).


The Model B55 Baron has two 260-horsepower Continental IO-470-L engines. The type received its FAA Type Approval in September 1963.


This is a Model E55 Baron. It has two 285-horsepower Continental IO-520-C engines.


In December 1969 Beech added to its twin-engine four-/six-seat Baron series of aircraft the Model 58 Baron. It differs from the earlier versions by having the forward fuselage extended by 10 inches (25,40 centimetres) more than on the Model E55, double passenger/cargo doors on the starboard side of the fuselage, a fourth window on each side of the cabin and redesigned engine nacelles. The Baron 58 is a four-, five- or six-seat cabin monoplane with cantilever low wings. The fuselage is a semimonocoque aluminium alloy structure and the tail unit is a cantilever all-metal structure.


Beech Aircraft announced on 26 May 1969 the addition of the Model 100 King Air to its fleet of corporate transport aircraft. Compared to the King Air 90 series, it has a fuselage that is four feet and two inches (1,27 metres) longer, a reduced wing span and a larger rudder and elevator. The Beechcraft King Air 100 is a pressurised twin-turboprop light passenger, freight or executive transport and is powered by two 680-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney (UACL) PT6A-28 turboprop engines.

Models in production during the period 1971 to 1972 (as reflected in Jane’s 1971-72)

From 1971 to 1972 the following models were in production:

Musketeer Custom, Sport, Super and Super R; Models V35B and V35B TC Bonanza; Models F33 and F33A Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza (USAF designation QU-22B); Models B55 and E55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A); Model A56 TC Turbo Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model A60 Duke; Model A65 Queen Air (US Army designation U-8F Seminole) and Queen Airliner A65; Model 70 Queen Air and Queen Airliner 70; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model 65-A90 King Air (US Army designations U-21A and RU-21A, B, C, D and E); Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6A); Models 99 Airliner, 99A Airliner and 99 Executive; and Model 100 King Air.


Illustrated here is a Model C90 King Air. This (then) latest model of the King Air is a pressurised six-/10-seat twin-turboprop business aircraft. It superseded the original Models 90, A90 and B90 King Air. The type is a cantilever low-wing monoplane with an aluminium alloy semimonocoque fuselage structure. Its tail unit consists of a cantilever all-metal structure with swept-back vertical surfaces. The engines comprise two 550-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney (UACL) PT6A-20 turboprop engines.

Models in production during the period 1972 to 1973 (as reflected in Jane’s 1972-73)

From 1972 to 1973 the following models were in production:

Sierra A24R, Sundowner C23 and Sport B19; Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and G33 Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza and military Pave Eagle and Pave Coin versions; Models B55 and E55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model A56 TC Turbo Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model A60 Duke; Model A65 Queen Air (US Army designation U-8F Seminole) and Queen Airliner A65; Model 70 Queen Air and Queen Airliner 70; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model 65-A90-1, -2, -3 and -4 King Air (US Army designations U-21A  and G and RU-21A, B, C, D and E); Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6A); Model E90 King Air; Models B99 Airliner and B99 Executive; and Models 100 and A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F).

In December 1971 Beech introduced a new light-aircraft-marketing programme centered on three models, which were given individual exterior paint schemes and had been renamed from their previous Musketeer designations. The new names for these aircraft were Beechcraft Sierra A24R (formerly Musketeer Super R), Sundowner C23 (formerly Musketeer Custom) and Sport B19 (formerly Musketeer Sport). The fourth aircraft in the former Musketeer line, the Super, was discontinued at the end of 1971 after a total of 367 units had been built.

The three aircraft had a new cabin door on the port side of the fuselage, the Sport B19 thus being the only US low-wing trainer with cabin doors on both sides. Also introduced for these aircraft in 1972 were three optional equipment packages and seven avionics packages that were interchangeable on all three models.


This is a Model C23 Sundowner. The Sundowner C23 is a basic four-seat version with a 180-horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4G engine and nonretractable landing gear. The aerobatic version is approved for rolls, Immelmann turns, loops, spins, chandelles and other manoeuvres, carrying two people.

Models in production during the period 1973 to 1974 (as reflected in Jane’s 1973-74)

From 1973 to 1974 the following models were in production:

Sierra A24R, Sundowner C23 and Sport B19; Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and G33 Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza and military Pave Eagle and Pave Coin versions; Models B55 and E55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model 58 Baron; Model A60 Duke; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B); Model E90 King Air; Models B99 Airliner and B99 Executive; and Models 100 and A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F).


Seen here is a Model V35B Bonanza. The Bonanza V35B is a four-/six-seat light cabin monoplane with cantilever low wings and has a conventional aluminium alloy semimonocoque fuselage structure. The tail unit of the type is of the “butterfly” type, consisting of a tailplane and elevators set at a 33-degree dihedral angle, and has a semimonocoque construction.

Models in production during the period 1974 to 1975 (as reflected in Jane’s 1974-75)

From 1974 to 1975 the following models were in production:

Sierra 200, Sundowner 180 and Sport 150; Beechcraft Turbo Mentor (US Navy designation YT-34C); Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Models B55 and E55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model 58 Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B); Model E90 King Air; Models B99 Airliner and B99 Executive; Models 100 and A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F); and Model 200 Super King Air.


This photograph depicts a Model 23 Sundowner 180. The power plant is a 180-horsepower Lycoming O-360-A4J engine, which drives a Sensenich Type 76EM865-0-60 two-blade fixed-pitch metal propeller, and the type has nonretractable landing gear. The aerobatic version is approved for rolls, Immelmann turns, loops, spins, chandelles and other manoeuvres, carrying two people.


This is a Model B60 Duke. The 1974 B60 version of the Duke has an engine overboost relief valve serving as a backup to the automatic system, redesigned engine intake valves, a nickel-cadmium battery failure detection system, an improved fuel injection system, an almost level rear cabin floor for the fifth and sixth seats and had the cabin length increased by six inches (0,15 metres), achieved by moving the pressurisation valves to the aft side of the rear bulkhead.

Models in production during the period 1975 to 1976 (as reflected in Jane’s 1975-76)

From 1975 to 1976 the following models were in production:

Beechcraft PD 285; Sierra 200, Sundowner 180 and Sport 150; Beechcraft Turbo Mentor (US Navy designation T-34C); Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Model 95-B55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model E55 Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model 58P Baron; Model 58 TC Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B, US Navy designation T-44A); Model E90 King Air; Model B99 Airliner; Models 100 and A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F) and Model B100 King Air); and Model 200 Super King Air (US military designations C-12 and RU-21J.

Models in production during the period 1976 to 1977 (as reflected in Jane’s 1976-77)

From 1976 to 1977 the following models were in production:

Beechcraft PD 285 (Model 77); Sierra 200, Sundowner 180 and Sport 150; Beechcraft Turbo Mentor (US Navy designation T-34C); Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Model 95-B55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model E55 Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model 58P Baron; Model 58 TC Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B, US Navy designation T-44A); Model E90 King Air; Model B99 Airliner; Models 100 and A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F) and Model B100 King Air; Model 200 Super King Air (US military designations C-12 and RU-21J); Beechcraft Fan Jet 400; and Beechcraft Model 76.


 This is a Model 58P Baron. First flown in late 1974, and certificated under FAR Part 23 in early 1975, the Baron Model 58P is a pressurised version of the Model 58 providing an 8 000-foot (2 440-metre) cabin environment at 18 000 feet (5 500 metres) altitude.


The Model E90 King Air combines the airframe of the King Air C90 with the 680-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney (UACL) PT6A-28 turboprop engines that power the King Air A100, each flat rated to 550 shaft horsepower.


In this view a Model A100 King Air is seen. Note the open engine cowling. The power plants of the aircraft are two 680-shaft-horsepower Pratt & Whitney (UACL) PT6A-28 turboprop engines. The King Air A100 is a light passenger, freight or executive transport. It is a cantilever low-wing monoplane. The fuselage is an aluminium alloy semimonocoque structure and is two feet and six inches (0,76 metres) longer forward of the wing and one foot and eight inches (0,51 metres) aft of the wing than the King Air C90. The tail unit comprises a cantilever all-metal structure with swept vertical surfaces and a ventral stabilising fin and there is a trim tab in the rudder.


Here a Model 200 Super King Air is illustrated. Project studies leading to the introduction of the Model 200 Super King Air began in mid-1969. The aircraft’s most salient feature is its large T-tail. The first Super King Air 200 flew on 27 October 1972. The type is a twin-turboprop passenger or executive light transport and it is a cantilever low-wing monoplane. The fuselage has a light-alloy semimonocoque structure of safe-life design. The tail unit has a conventional cantilever T-tail structure of light alloy with swept vertical and horizontal surfaces.

Models in production during the period 1978 to 1979 (as reflected in Jane’s 1978-79)

From 1978 to 1979 the following models were in production:

Beechcraft Model 77 Skipper; Sierra 200, Sundowner 180 and Sport 150; Beechcraft Turbo Mentor (US Navy designation T-34C); Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Model 95-B55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model E55 Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model 58P Baron; Model 58 TC Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model B80 Queen Air and Queen Airliner B80; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B); Model E90 King Air; Beechcraft T-44A (King Air 90); Model B99 Airliner; Model A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F), Model B100 King Air and Model C100 King Air; and Model 200 Super King Air (US military designations C-12 and RU-21J).


Seen in this photograph is a Model 76 Duchess. The Duchess, a four-seat light aircraft with two engines, flew for the first time on 24 May 1977 and received FAA certification on 24 January 1978. A test-bed version of this aircraft had been undergoing a comprehensive flight test programme since September 1974. The Duchess has been designed for the personal-light-twin, light-charter and multiengine-flight-trainer markets. Three optional factory-installed equipment packages, namely the Weekender, Holiday and Professional, were available in 1978/79. The machine is a four-seat cabin monoplane, has low-mounted cantilever wings and has a light-alloy semimonocoque structure. The tail unit has a conventional cantilever T-tail structure of light alloy with swept vertical surfaces and a fixed-incidence tailplane with a trim tab in the rudder and each elevator.

Models in production during the period 1980 to 1981 (as reflected in Jane’s 1980-81)

From 1980 to 1981 the following models were in production:

Beechcraft Model 77 Skipper; Sierra 200 and Sundowner 180; Beechcraft Model T-34C (US Navy designation T-34C); Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Model A36 TC Turbo Bonanza; Model 76 Duchess; Model 95-B55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model E55 Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model 58P Baron; Model 58 TC Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B); Model E90 King Air; Beechcraft T-44A (King Air 90); Model F90 Super King Air; Model C99 Commuter; Model 1900; Model A100 King Air and Model B100 King Air; Model 200 Super King Air (US military designations C-12 and RU-21J); and Beechcraft Maritime Patrol 200T.


Beech introduced for 1979 a turbocharged version of the Model A36 Bonanza, namely the Model A36 TC Turbo Bonanza. The type is a cantilever low-wing monoplane with a conventional aluminium alloy semimonocoque fuselage structure. The tail unit has a conventional cantilever all-metal stressed-skin structure, primarily of aluminium alloy but with corrugated magnesium skin on the elevators, with a large trim tab in each elevator and a fixed tab in the rudder. The power plant is a 223,7-kilowatt (300-horsepower) Continental TSIO-520-UB turbocharged flat-six engine.


This is a Model F90 Super King Air. Basically the Super King Air F90 combines the pressurised fuselage of the King Air 90 with reduced-span wings similar to those of the King Air 100 and a T-tail assembly similar to that of the Super King Air 200. New Beechcraft assemblies and technology were used throughout the type’s construction. The F90 is a seven-/10-seat twin-turboprop business aircraft and is a cantilever low-wing monoplane, with a deicing system fitted as standard in the wings. The fuselage has an aluminium alloy semimonocoque structure. The tail unit has a conventional cantilever T-tail structure of light alloy with swept vertical and horizontal surfaces and a fixed-incidence tailplane; tailplane deicing is standard. The power plants are two 559-kilowatt (750-shaft-horsepower) Pratt & Whitney Aircraft of Canada PT6A-135 turboprop engines that each drives a Hartzell FT 101 73 four-blade propeller.

Models in production during the period 1981 to 1982 (as reflected in Jane’s 1981-82)

From 1981 to 1982 the following models were in production:

Beechcraft Model T-34C (US Navy designation T-34C); Beechcraft Model 77 Skipper; Sierra 200 and Sundowner 180; Model V35B Bonanza; Models F33A and F33C Bonanza; Model A36 Bonanza; Model A36 TC Turbo Bonanza; Model 76 Duchess; Model 95-B55 Baron (US Army designation T-42A Cochise); Model E55 Baron; Model 58 Baron; Model 58P Baron; Model 58 TC Baron; Model B60 Duke; Model C90 King Air (USAF designation VC-6B); Model E90 King Air; Beechcraft T-44A (King Air 90); Model F90 Super King Air; Model C99 Commuter; Model 1900 Commuter; Model A100 King Air (US Army designation U-21F) and Model B100 King Air; and Models 200 and B200 Super King Air (US military designations C-12 and RU-21J); and Beechcraft Maritime Patrol 200T.

The Model B200 Super King Air, introduced in April 1981, is generally similar to the Super King Air 200, except for the installation of Pratt & Whitney Aircraft of Canada PT6A-42 turboprop engines, which provide better cruise and altitude performance than the PT6A-41s in the original Super King Air 200.Four versions of the Super King Air B200 are available, namely the Super King Air B200 (the basic version), the Super King Air B200C [with a cargo door of four feet and four inches by four feet and four inches (1,32 metres by 1,32 metres) as standard], the Super King Air B200T (generally similar to the Maritime Patrol 200T, with standard provision to carry removable wingtip tanks to increase maximum fuel capacity) and the Super King Air B200CT (version with both cargo door and wingtip tank provisions as standard).


This is the standard version of the Model B200 Super King Air. The B200 is a twin-turboprop passenger or executive light transport and is a cantilever low-wing monoplane. It has a light-alloy semimonocoque fuselage structure of safe-life design. The tail unit has a conventional cantilever T-tail structure of light alloy with swept vertical and horizontal surfaces and a fixed-incidence tailplane. There is a trim tab in each elevator and an anti-servo tab in the rudder.

Model 2000 Starship

During 1983 Beech announced the Model 2000 Starship, which was an advanced and revolutionary business aircraft made from composite materials. Constructor’s numbers for the Starship ran from NC-1 to NC-53.

Model 400


In December 1985 Beech Aircraft Corporation acquired from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Mitsubishi Aircraft International the Diamond II business jet programme. Beech had worldwide marketing rights outside Japan and the aircraft was redesignated the Model 400 Beechjet.

Changes in the name and structure of the company

At the end of 1979 Beech, which was the last of the prewar aviation companies in America to remain under the direction of the founding family, agreed to merge with Raytheon. This merger was approved by the stockholders on 8 February 1980. In 1994 Raytheon merged Beechcraft with the Hawker product line it had acquired in 1993 from British Aerospace, forming Raytheon Aircraft Company. In 2002 the Beechcraft brand was revived to designate once again the Wichita-produced aircraft. In 2006 Raytheon sold Raytheon Aircraft to Goldman Sachs, creating Hawker-Beechcraft. Since its inception Beechcraft has resided in Wichita, Kansas, also the home of chief competitor, Cessna.

The entry into bankruptcy of Hawker-Beechcraft on 3 May 2012 ended with its emergence, on 16 February 2013, as a new entity, namely Beechcraft Corporation. The new and much smaller company would produce the King Air line of aircraft as well as the T-6 and AT-6 military trainer/attack aircraft, as well as the piston-powered single-engine Bonanza and twin-engine Baron.
On 26 December 2013 Textron agreed to purchase Beechcraft. Beechcraft and Cessna were to be combined to form a new light-aircraft-manufacturing concern, Textron Aviation. Beechcraft has been a brand of Textron Aviation since 2014. Textron has kept both the Beechcraft and Cessna names as separate brands.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This article is based on Beech Aircraft and the information about the changes in the name and structure of the company is based on Wikipedia 2017. The definitions of various technical terms were taken from Wragg.

SOURCES

Aircraft of the U.S.A.F. – sixty years in pictures; Paul Ellis; Jane’s Publishing Company; 1980

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Jane’s 1970-71 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1970-71; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1970-71

Jane’s 1971-72 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1971-72; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1971-72

Jane’s 1972-73 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1972-73; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1972-73

Jane’s 1973-74 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1973-74; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1973-74

Jane’s 1974-75 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1974-75; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1974-75

Jane’s 1976-77 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1976-77; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1976-77

Jane’s 1978-79 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1978-79; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Yearbooks; 1978-79

Jane’s 1980-81 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1980-81; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Publishing Company; 1980-81

Jane’s 1981-82 = Jane’s All the World’s Aircraft 1981-82; John WR Taylor (editor); Jane’s Publishing Company; 1981-82

Jane’s Encyclopedia of Aviation, compiled and edited by Michael JH Taylor, with various contributors; Crescent Books, 1995

The Encyclopedia of the World’s Civil Aircraft; compiled by David Mondey; Hamlyn-Aerospace; 1981

THE GENERAL AVIATION HANDBOOK – A Guide to Postwar General Aviation, Manufacturers and their Aircraft; Rod Simpson; Midland Publishing; 2005

The Observer’s World Airlines and Airliners Directory; William Green and Gordon Swarnborough; Frederick Warne & Co Ltd; 1975

Wikipedia 2017 = Wikipedia.org; 2017-10-31

Wragg = A Dictionary of Aviation; David W Wragg; Osprey Publishing; 1973

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