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Africa Aerospace and Defence 2006


INTRODUCTION

The Africa Aerospace and Defence (AAD) exhibition took place from 20 to 24 September 2006 at Air Force Base (AFB) Ysterplaat in the Cape Peninsula (19 September was a media day while 20 to 22 September were trade days and 23 and 24 September were public days). AAD occurs every two years and is a partnership initiative between the military and the civilian sector. It is the largest exhibition of its kind on the African continent and it provides an opportunity for industries from the international defence and civil sectors to demonstrate their latest products and technologies to visitors and delegations from around the world. This year, ships (displayed in Table Harbour) formed part of the exhibition for the first time. Although products covering the land, sea and air sectors were put on display, only aviation-related exhibits are covered in this article.
 
HISTORY OF AAD
 
AAD can be traced back to the Aviation Africa International (AAI), Dexsa (military) and African Aerospace (AA) shows of previous years. AAI was also a biennial exhibition and first took place at Lanseria Airport in October 1975. The Dexsa (Defence Exhibition of South Africa), AAI and AA shows were held at various venues over the years. AAI was held at Lanseria Airport, Rand Airport and Jan Smuts Airport (since renamed Johannesburg International Airport and more recently OR Thambo Airport). AFB Waterkloof played host to both Dexsa and AA in the past, while Dexsa also took place at the Rand Show Grounds.
 
So far Waterkloof has proved to be the best venue (with Lanseria and Johannesburg International – with its heavy traffic – being not particularly suited to an airshow of this calibre), but the change to AFB Ysterplaat was necessitated due to a major upgrading of the existing runways at Waterkloof.
 
REVIEW OF AAD 2006
 
Personal views and observations
 
Many exhibitors (from the Gauteng region, where AAD took place in 2000, 2002 and 2004) indicated that they would rather give AAD 2006 a miss or would have a smaller presence there due to the logistics and costs involved in exhibiting their wares in Cape Town rather than in Gauteng. In fact, a representative from an exhibitor that is based in Gauteng told me that the Cape Town venue caused a major problem for them. However, I noted that Cape Town companies such as Robin Coss Aviation used the opportunity to promote themselves at AAD 2006.
 
I live in Gauteng and it cost me quite a bit of money to travel to Cape Town and back, but I decided to make the most of it and to have a holiday with my family at the same time. Cape Town is very popular as a tourist destination. I also used the opportunity to visit other aviation venues (see the article about aviation venues in the Eastern and Western Cape).
 
Before airshows of this nature there are always concerns that it would not be worth attending because there would not be any interesting aircraft or much fewer aircraft. There appear to have been less aircraft at AAD 2006 than in e.g. AAD 2002, but there certainly were some interesting aircraft at AAD 2006. Several firsts were also recorded. Some of the interesting aircraft included the SAAF’s first Gripen (displayed under the banner of BAE Systems), which, in my personal opinion, was the star of the show. Furthermore the Bombardier Global 5000 made its debut at AAD 2006 Exhibition.
 
Exhibitors
 
An interesting array of aviation-related products (from missiles to engines and from the smallest homebuilt to airliners as well as military aircraft) was exhibited at AAD 2006. The following text is a summary of some of the exhibitors that attended AAD 2006, a reflection of observations made during the media day and trade days as well as various press statements released before and during the exhibition. NOTE: no details are given of the two airshow days.
 
Aerobatic teams
 
Aerobatic teams included the private Flying Lions (Harvards ZU-AYS, ZU-BET, ZU-BEU and ZU-BMC) and Sasol Tigers (L-29 Delfins ZU-AUX, ZU-CYH and ZU-CYI) and the Silver Falcons of the SAAF’s Central Flying School (for details see the SAAF). Tragically Martin van Straaten of the Sasol Tigers lost his life when his aircraft crashed into Table Bay on the afternoon of 22 September 2006 while practising for the displays on the public days. The Flying Lions had Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos on their aircraft, but no Flying Lions titles and logos.

The Flying Lions


The Flying Lions Formation Aerobatic Team has had various sponsors. From March 2000 the team was sponsored by Peugeot and from April 2001 it was also sponsored by Air BP. After having entered discussions in December 2002, Nissan eventually took over Peugeot’s part of the sponsorship. Institutions such as Castrol Aviator and Academy Brushware also joined as sponsors. As the team is looking for a new major sponsor, it is assumed that Nissan is no longer a sponsor. The aircraft is seen on 21 September 2006 while being prepared for static display at AAD 2006.



The Flying Lions comprise Harvards ZU-AYS, ZU-BET, ZU-BEU and ZU-BMC. Here two of the team’s aircraft (ZU-AYS and ZU-BEU) are seen while flying as part of a three-ship formation on 21 September 2006.


In this view Harvard ZU-BMC of the Flying Lions Formation Aerobatic Team is shown practising its solo routine on 21 September 2006. The display routine of the Flying Lions includes three-ship formation flying as well as solo aerobatics. All four aircraft are Harvards. While no Flying Lions titles were seen on the aircraft, they did have Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos.

Sasol Tigers


All three Sasol Tigers (L-29s ZU-AUX, ZU-CYH and ZU-CYI) can be seen in this view at Air Force Base Ysterplaat on 21 September 2006.


Martin van Straaten lost his life in this Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin (ZU-CYI, White 97) of the Sasol Tigers. The aircraft crashed into the sea off Milnerton at about 15:50 on 22 September 2006 while taking part in a formation display flight. Martin was a highly experienced former South African aerobatics champion and had logged over 2,500 flight hours. The aircraft was manufactured in 1972 and had logged about 3,500 flight hours. It received its last overhaul and service in April this year.
 
AgustaWestland
 
AgustaWestland, a Finmeccanica company, put aircraft on static inside as well as outside the display hall. This included civilian (an A109 Grand ZS-HMD and an AW 139 ZS-EOS) as well as military helicopters (4006, one of the South African Air Force’s A109 LUHs). During AAD 2006 the company made several announcements regarding contracts and deliveries. Some of these aircraft are discussed below.
  
AW139
 
As far as Africa is concerned, at least ten AW139s have already been ordered by and is used in Namibia and Zambia in the VIP transport role where the aircraft’s exceptional performance in hot-and-high conditions is being successfully utilised. AgustaWestland signed a contract with the Nigerian Government for four AW139 helicopters configured for corporate transport and Search and Rescue (SAR) missions. The helicopters will be operated by the Nigerian State House, the Government of River States and the Nigerian Navy.
 
The AW139 is a new-generation medium twin-turbine helicopter and is designed with inherent multi-role capability and flexibility of operation. It is capable of carrying up to 15 passengers or six litters with four medical attendants at the highest speed, in the most spacious cabin and with the best power reserve of any other helicopter in the medium twin-engine class.
 
Passenger accommodation is provided in a large and unobstructed cabin. The baggage compartment, measuring 3.4 cubic meters, is accessible from the cabin and externally through two large hinged doors on both sides of the rear fuselage.
 
A new state-of-the-art five-bladed main rotor and a four-bladed tail rotor provide a smooth ride together with high speed and a low noise signature. Easy ground handling and taxiing, as well as operation from unprepared terrain, is made possible by the heavy-duty nose-wheel tricycle landing gear, which is retractable for higher speed.  Fully crashworthy systems and seats are standard in the AW139, while icing protection will be available as an option.


Part of AgustaWestland’s static display at Africa Aerospace and Defence 2006 included this AW139 (ZS-EOS). It is the first of the type to be delivered to South Africa and made its appearance at AAD following an eight-day ferry flight from Milan in Northern Italy to Cape Town in South Africa earlier in September. The aircraft is owned and operated by a South African businessman. During the ferry flight, which started at AgustaWestland’s Vergiate factory, a distance of 6,388 nm (11,830 km) was covered and en route stops were made in Crete, Egypt, Sudan, Eritrea, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.


ZS-EOS is a VIP-configured AW139 and is finished in this eye-catching colour scheme. The helicopter is owned and operated by a South African businessman. After having been designed by a South African artist, the colour scheme was applied to the aircraft by an airbrush artist (also from South Africa) at AgustaWestland’s Vergiate facility.
 
A109 Power
 
The South African National Port Authority (NPA) selected the A109 Power for its Harbour Pilot Shuttle (HPS) service in Richards Bay. The NPA has since 1998 been operating AgustaWestland A109K2 helicopters. The NPA’s A109 Power HPS will perform marine-pilot-service operations, search and rescue missions, emergency medical evacuation and general support to international shipping.
 
The A109 Power HPS is the standard-setting helicopter in terms of safety, mission capability and versatility. The aircraft is equipped with two new-generation Pratt & Whitney or Turbomeca engines equipped with FADEC, which allows the automatic management of both engines, thus reducing and simplifying the starting procedure and pilot workload during flight. The aircraft is certified for full Class 1 performance from ground-based or elevated helipads even in hot-and-high environments.
 
The A109 Power is single-pilot IFR certified. The available internal space, the easy access to the cabin and the functional layout allow rapid role changes from marine-pilot transport to passenger and cargo transport to aerial-ambulance configuration with one or two longitudinal litters and two medical attendant seats. In the standard HPS configuration, the Power is equipped with three rear seats and one central swiveling seat used by the hoist operator. The A109 Power HPS offers today’s harbour pilot authorities a modern, safe, and efficient way to increase a port’s productivity while decreasing port congestion and transport costs.
 
South African, Chinese and American operators are already benefiting from the advantages of operating A109 Powers in the HPS configuration.
 
The Grand
 
The Grand is a new top-of-the-range light-twin helicopter developed to meet a wide range of roles, providing the cabin space and payload that until now could only be met by larger more expensive helicopters. The Grand’s spacious and easily accessible cabin features an unobstructed 2.30 m (7 ft 7 in) long passenger section and 1.40 m (4 ft 7 in) wide sliding cabin doors. The Grand’s wide selection of interiors and equipment provides the versatility to accomplish missions such as corporate/VIP transportation, SAR, EMS, offshore operations, law enforcement and coastal patrol.
 
The Grand has a maximum take-off weight of 3,175 kg (7,000 lb). The combination of 608 kW (815 shp) new generation Pratt & Whitney PW207C turbo shaft engines with electronic control (FADEC) and an uprated transmission ensure outstanding performance, in both hovering and forward flight, including Full Class 1 operation. The resulting payload/range capability and the very high cruise speed make the Grand an unrivalled helicopter in its category.


This Agusta A109 Grand (ZS-HMD) was officially handed over on 21 September 2006 to the South African entrepreneur David Mostert. The aircraft is configured with a six-passenger VIP interior and is the third Grand ordered by South African customers. It is, however, not David’s first encounter with the helicopter. During the ferry flight from AgustaWestland’s factory in Vergiate near Milan in Northern Italy to Cape Town he spent many hours at the controls. Routing via Crete, Luxor, Addis Abeba, Zanzibar, Lusaka, Bulawayo, Polokwane and George, the trip took eight days and was “the best geography lesson my kids have ever had.” (David’s family accompanied him on the trip.)
 
A109 LUH
 
AgustaWestland is the supplier of 30 new Light Utility Helicopters to the South African Air Force and four specialised maritime helicopters of the latest Super Lynx 300 type. The aircraft, which are currently being taken into service and have already proved their versatility in a variety of roles from search-and-rescue via forward observation to VIP transport, replace the SAAF’s ageing fleet of Alouette III helicopters, many of which were first brought into service 40 years ago.
 
The first A 109 Light Utility Helicopter assembled for the SAAF by Denel made its successful first flight on 1 September 2004. The collaborative program, which is designed to strengthen South Africa’s aerospace industry, foresees the assembly of five SAAF helicopters in Italy and 25 in South Africa. Besides Denel, a number of other South African manufacturers have partnered AgustaWestland on the SAAF re-equipment program.
 
Air Force of Zimbabwe
 
The Zimbabweans sent the same two aircraft that attended Fighter Meet 2005 at AFB Makhado to AAD 2006 (K-8 Karakorums 2104E and 2106G).


K-8 Karakorums of 2 Squadron of the Air Force of Zimbabwe made yet another appearance at a local airshow. (The same aircraft appeared at Fighter Meet 2005, which was held at AFB Makhado in October last year.) The K-8s are finished in a camouflaged scheme of sand and light green and off-white undersurfaces. Markings consist of the Zimbabwean bird (starboard side of tailfin), Zimbabwean roundel, serial number in full on the tailfin (last two digits repeated below cockpit) and Zimbabwean flag (port side of tailfin). The aircraft is seen returning after a flight on 19 September 2006.
 
Support aircraft

Several aircraft that were not directly involved with AAD 2006 were seen at Ysterplaat during the period 19 to 21 September 2006. These included CASA 212-200 number 800 of the Zimbabwean Air Force, which was used as support aircraft for the K-8s.


CASA 212-200 Aviocar of 3 Squadron of the Air Force of Zimbabwe taxying in on 19 September 2006. It was used as support aircraft for the K-8s. The Aviocar’s colour scheme comprises a camouflage of dark earth and dark green with cream undersurfaces. The following markings were seen on the aircraft: Zimbabwean bird (on starboard side of tailfin), flag (on port side of tailfin) and roundel (on rear fuselage, both sides). The aircraft’s constructor’s number is A45-1-288.
 
AirQuarius
 
AirQuarius was launched in February 1997 as a small charter company. The company specialises in the air charter of medium to large groups, focussing on the corporate and incentive-travel segments. Aircraft are leased. AirQuarius Aviation, a specialist aircraft charter and leasing company and is based at Lanseria International Airport. The company operates a fleet of Fokker F28 aircraft, and Fokker F-28-4000 ZS-JAV Bella-Donna was exhibited at AAD 2006.


Fokker F-28-4000 ZS-JAV of AirQuarius arrived on 19 September 2006 and was subsequently put on static display. Note the AirQuarius titles (on the fuselage) and Executive Avionic Solutions titles and logo (on the tailfin), the name Bella-Donna (on the nose), the full registration (on the empennage; repeated on the nose-wheel door) and numerous stickers all over the aircraft.


This close-up view of Fokker F-28 ZS-JAV shows the details on the nose of the aircraft.
 
Airvan Africa


Airvan Africa displayed this GA-8 Airvan in the AAD 2006 static park. According to the data plate the aircraft was manufactured by Gippsland Aeronautics Pty. Ltd. Latrobe Regional Airport, Morwell Victoria, Australia and it has the constructor’s number GA8-08-053. The aircraft is all-white with an Australian flag on the tailfin, Airvan titles and a black registration. The Airvan is an eight-seat aircraft that can be operated in rugged terrain and from short bush strips. Its high-wing design and convex windows gives it excellent visibility. Some of its features are that it is easy and inexpensive to maintain and operate, can be maintained in the field and has all-mechanical controls.

ATE
 
Advanced Technology and Engineering (ATE) showcased the glass-cockpit avionics systems developed for the SAAF’s Astra (2025) and Hawk Lead-in Fighter Trainer (263) and the upgraded operational capability of the Mi-24 attack helicopter (ZU-BOI) as well as the production version of the Vulture tactical unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system.


ATE also displayed the production version of its Vulture tactical unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system. In this view the launch vehicle as well as a part of the recovery system for the UAV can be seen.


Advanced Technology and Engineering (ATE) is also involved in upgrades for various SAAF aircraft. The company showcased, amongst others, the glass-cockpit avionics systems developed for the Hawk Lead-in Fighter Trainer.  Hawk Mk 120 number 263 is depicted in ATE’s large enclosed static display area at AAD 2006.
 
ATE's SuperHind was the first Mi-24 upgrade to reach operational status as early as 1999. The SuperHind Mk III was presented for the first time at AAD 2002 as a cost-effective alternative to new combat helicopters. The Mk III is one of several upgrade packages offered by ATE for the Mi-24. It is believed to be the first advanced Mi-24 upgrade to achieve market success. ATE operates at least two Mi-24 combat helicopters and uses them for development and flight-test purposes. Both helicopters are Mi-24 V (Hind-E) derivatives. The first one to be operational, ZU-BOI, was used to develop the SuperHind Mk III.


ATE’s Super Hind Mk III upgrade of the Mi-24 was put on static display and took part in the flying display. When this view was photographed on 20 September 2006, the helicopter was returning after practising for its display on the public days.


In this three-quarter-front view the offensive capabilities of this potent attack helicopter is illustrated.


Advanced Technologies and Engineering's Super Hind was the first Mi-24 upgrade to reach operational status as early as 1999, is believed to be the first advanced Mi-24 upgrade to achieve market success and is based on the Mi-24V (Hind-E) airframe. ZU-BOI was also displayed at AAD2002 and AAD 2004, but this was the first time that the aircraft took part in the flying display.

BAE Systems
 
BAE Systems is a premier global defence and aerospace company delivering a full range of products and services for air, land and naval forces, as well as advanced electronics, information-technology solutions and customer support services. It has home markets in the UK, US, Australia, South Africa and Sweden. With more than 100,000 employees worldwide, BAE Systems’ sales exceeded GB £15.4 billion (US$28 billion) in 2005.
 
South Africa’s first new-generation Gripen fighter jet, which arrived in the country just in July 2006, was put on static display and participated in the flying program at AAD 2006. No aerobatics were undertaken by the aircraft as it was heavily instrumented for its test-flight and development program, designed to validate equipment specific to the South African version of the aircraft.
 
The aircraft made its public debut on Tuesday, 19 September 2006, on the eve of the Africa Aerospace & Defence 2006 exhibition at Air Force Base Ysterplaat in Cape Town. This two-seat version of the Gripen fighter aircraft (SA01), wearing South African Air Force (SAAF) livery and bearing the South African flag, has been based at the Test Flight Development Centre (TFDC) near Bredasdorp in the Southern Cape, where it has been prepared for a thorough and intensive South African flight test programme.


BAE Systems displayed South Africa’s first Gripen new-generation fighter at AAD 2006. The aircraft made its public debut on 19 September 2006, on the eve of Africa Aerospace & Defence 2006. This two-seat version of the Gripen fighter aircraft arrived in South Africa in July 2006 and has been based at the Test Flight Development Centre (TFDC) near Bredasdorp in the Southern Cape, where it has been prepared for a thorough and intensive South African flight-test programme. A team of technical experts from Saab has been seconded from Sweden to TFDC for two years, to work alongside their South African counterparts from the SAAF, Armscor and Denel on the flight-test programme. When completed, this programme will lead directly to the delivery of the first Gripen to South Africa in early 2008. According to Gripen International Managing Director, Johan Lehander, Saab and the South African Department of Defence agreed to temporarily release the aircraft from its intensive flight-test programme so that it can appear at the show. The aircraft was flown by Gripen test pilot Magnus Olsson. 
 
A team of technical experts from the Gripen’s manufacturer, Saab, has been seconded from Sweden to TFDC for two years, to work alongside their South African counterparts from the SAAF, Armscor and Denel on the flight test programme. When completed, this programme will lead directly to the delivery of the first Gripen to South Africa in early 2008.
 
In 1999, South Africa signed a US$2.2-billion contract with Saab-BAE Systems to supply a fleet of Gripen new-generation fighters and Hawk Lead-in Fighter Trainers, as part of the Strategic Defence Procurement programme.  This will result in the modernisation of the SAAF’s fighter fleet, while ensuring the SAAF is able to fulfill all of its national, regional defence and peace-support duties. 
 
Arising from this procurement contract, Saab-BAE Systems are also delivering new economic benefits to South Africa, through reciprocal Industrial Participation offset ventures in a wide array of industrial sectors. This includes the production of major Gripen aircraft components and sub-assemblies by various South African companies, including Denel, Avitronics and Comau-AIMS. To date, Saab-BAE Systems have implemented more than 70 offset projects in more than 40 sectors such as gold and platinum beneficiation, automotive component manufacturing, timber product exports, tourism development, bio-technology, medical research, commercial marine engineering and ship repair, power-generation components, mining equipment manufacture and wine exports. These account for over US$600 million of new investments in local businesses and are on track to yield over US$3 billion of new revenues by 2011. To date, more than 75 South African companies are partners in BAE Systems and Saab’s projects, which are categorised as: (1) Defence Industrial Participation (DIP), which involves the delivery of US$1.5-billion of new economic activity into the aerospace and defence sectors. (2) National Industrial Participation (NIP), which comprises US$7.2-billion of new economic benefits derived primarily from manufacturing-for-export ventures in various civil sectors.  These include, among others, the heavy engineering, mining and minerals, forestry & timber, automotive, agriculture, tourism, medical research, bio-technology and information technology sectors. 
 

This SAAB Gripen D, the two-seat version of South Africa’s first new-generation fighter jet, is the first Gripen to bear a South African Air Force livery and the national flag. Other markings include the unit badge of 2 Squadron. The aircraft is finished in a lowviz 2-tone grey camouflage. The AAD 2006 flight programme did not include any aerobatics, because the particular aircraft was heavily instrumented for its test-flight and development program, designed to validate equipment specific to the South African version of the aircraft.


After the SAAF Gripen D 01’s inaugural public flying display on 19 September 2006 at AAD, a photo session took place next to the aircraft. In a relaxed mood (from left to right) are Magnus Olsson (Gripen test pilot), Per Erlandsson (Chief Executive Officer, Saab South Africa), Johan Lehander (Managing Director, Gripen International) and Lieutenant General Carlo Gagiano (Chief of the South African Air Force).


In the Full-Scale Replica of the Gripen fighter (which was displayed for the first time at AAD) VIPs, pilots, ground crew, the media and the general public had an opportunity to personally see and feel what South Africa’s future fighter pilots will experience.

Boeing
 
Boeing also had no aircraft at AAD 2006, but probably upstaged its competitor, Airbus, by having a full-scale mockup of the cabin of the Boeing Dreamliner with examples of different seat classes.


Boeing probably upstaged Airbus by having a full-scale mockup of the passenger cabin of its Boeing 787 Dreamliner at AAD 2006 to give passengers an idea of what to expect when they will fly in the aircraft.

Comair


Comair is one of the companies that had several aircraft on display at AAD 2006. However, one aircraft of NAC is also visible in this image. The aircraft are (from left to right): Cessna 208B Grand Caravan N208AZ, Cessna 182T Skylane ZS-MJP, Hawker 850XP A6-ELC (displayed by NAC), Enstrom 280FX ZS-OER, Enstrom 480B ZS-RXC and Citation Sovereign N927LT.
 

Comair is the Cessna agent in South Africa. N208AZ is a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan and has constructor’s number 208B1175 (registered to Cessna). 


Cessna 525A Citation CJ2+ constructor’s number 525A0302 featured in Comair’s static-display area. The aircraft was seen on the flight line several times and was presumably demonstrated to prospective customers.


This view of Cessna 680 Citation Sovereign constructor’s number 680-0070 was taken in Comair’s section of the static park at AAD 2006.


According to the data plate on ZS-MJP it is a Cessna 182T Skylane that was manufactured by Cessna Aircraft Company Wichita Kansas and has constructor’s number 182T81753. The aircraft formed part of the Comair static display.


Two helicopters also featured in Comair’s static-display area. This is Enstrom 280FX ZS-OER. On the helicopter’s data plate it is mentioned that the machine was manufactured by Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Menominee Michigan, that its constructor’s number is 2121 and that it was manufactured on 22 February 2006.


The other helicopter displayed by Comair was Enstrom 480B ZS-RXC. Close inspection of the data plate on the machine revealed that it was manufactured by Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Menominee Michigan, that it has constructor’s number 5078 and that it was manufactured on 30 March 2005.

Dassault


Several corporate aircraft (informally known as bizjets) were showcased at AAD 2006. Dassault had an example of its Falcon 900EX at the exhibition. On the fuselage the aircraft was identified as a Falcon 900EX EASy. The constructor’s number of the machine is 155.

Denel
 

The Denel Group showcased some of its world-class defence and aerospace systems at AAD 2006 during the period 20 to 24 September 2006. Denel used AAD 2006 to give its clients and stakeholders in the Western Cape the opportunity to personally see the “indigenously developed products for which Denel is renowned,” explained Shaun Liebenberg, Denel’s Chief Executive Officer. Inside Hall 5 the company showed visitors its range of sophisticated missiles and precision-guided weapons. These included the Ingwe and Mokopa anti-tank missiles as well as the heavy Umkhonto IR surface-to-air missile, now part of the shipborne air-defence systems for the South African Navy’s Meko class light frigates and the Finnish Navy’s new Hamina and Hameenma class patrol vessels.

The Denel-developed Rooivalk attack helicopter, on static display outside Hall 5, is in service with the South African Air Force (SAAF). Some of the SAAF’s latest acquisitions, notably the Agusta A109 light utility helicopter (LUH), the Hawk Lead-in Fighter Trainer and the Gripen advanced fighter jet were main attractions at the show.  Denel is an industrial partner in these programmes, having built large fuselage structures for these aircraft and also doing final assembly of the A109 helicopter and Hawk.


Denel’s Rooivalk attack helicopter was put on static display outside Hall 5 from 21 September 2006. The type is now in service with the South African Air Force (SAAF), where it is operated by 16 Squadron. Markings on the aircraft include the full serial number (680), the nine-point star and the unit badge. 
 
Denel Aerostructures, in which Saab has recently acquired an equity stake, showed its activities relating to the design and manufacture of large structures for the A400M military transport aircraft in which South Africa is a partner.
 
Inside Hall 5 Denel showed visitors its range of sophisticated missiles and precision-guided weapons.  These included the Ingwe and Mokopa anti-tank missiles to the heavy Umkhonto IR surface-to-air missile, now part of shipborne air-defence systems for the South African Navy’s Meko class light frigates and the Finnish Navy’s new Hamina and Hameenma class patrol vessels. 
 
In August 2006 the South African Police Services (SAPS) awarded Denel Optronics a contract for the supply of Goshawk 350 airborne surveillance systems for SAPS helicopters. To illustrate the Goshawk 350’s crime-prevention capabilities, Denel and the SAPS each had a display screen in Halls 5 and 7 respectively showing live footage from the SAPS helicopter patrolling over Cape Town.
 
Denel Optronics also showcased its laser rangefinder and target-acquisition equipment, like the innovative Eagle-Eye, as well as helmet-mounted sighting and tracking systems.  Pilots of the Gripen and Eurofighter Typhoon jet fighters use these systems from Denel, which was also evaluated for the modern French Rafale jet fighter.
 
Design and manufacturing is being ramped up at Denel Aerostructures as the company’s role in the new Airbus A400M military transport aircraft takes off. In the latest development, Denel has been awarded responsibility for the supply of ribs, spars and swords – the “bones” which form the skeleton structure – for the aircraft’s vertical tailplane (VTP).  The forward spar in the VTP is approximately 6.8m in length and the rear spar 7.4m in length.  This is the longest single monolithic carbon composite structure yet to be manufactured at the Denel Aerostructures composite facility. This is the latest in a string of orders for design engineering, manufacturing and supply of components that have been awarded to Denel since South Africa formally joined the A400M programme as a partner in April 2005. 
 
South Africa’s participation in the programme was prompted by Government’s decision to modernise the SAAF’s transport fleet with A400Ms. It will receive eight of the four-engined turbo-prop aircraft from 2010. These versatile aircraft will be deployed on military, peacekeeping, humanitarian and disaster relief missions. Earlier this year Denel delivered the first A400M fuselage top-shells (“roof”) that have been incorporated into the body of the first A400M currently being assembled in Bremen, Germany. One of the biggest elements manufactured by Denel is the wing-to-fuselage fairing. This complex and precision-engineered structure is one of the most important aerodynamic elements of the aircraft, ensuring a smooth, streamlined and undisrupted flow of air around the area where the wings and aircraft body are joined.
 
Denel Aerostructures will initially deliver 173 VTP shipsets (a shipset comprises two spars, 14 ribs and a sword) to Airbus. It is envisaged that this number will increase as new customers place additional orders for the A400M aircraft.
 
EADS
 
Airbus

Airbus (as part of the EADS display) exhibited the A320 and A380 and Airbus Military the A400M – all in model form.
 
The company is a long-standing supplier of jetliners to South African Airways, which currently operates a mixed fleet of 29 modern Airbus products, comprising A340-200, A340-300 and A340-600 long-range aircraft on its international routes and A319s on its regional/domestic network. Earlier Airbus types operated by SAA include the A300 (from the 1970s) and the A320 (from 1991/1992).


Airbus is a long-standing supplier of jetliners to South African Airways, which currently operates a mixed fleet of 29 modern Airbus products, comprising A340-200, A340-300 and A340-600 long-range aircraft on its international routes and A319s on its regional/domestic network. Previously SAA operated the A300 as well as the A320. At the end of July 2006, Airbus had won more than 6 480 orders for new aircraft. Of these, 4 383 have been delivered while the backlog scheduled for delivery represents about five years of manufacturing at current output rates.
 
In 2005, South Africa signed a contract to acquire eight Airbus A400M airlifters to modernise and enhance the airlift capability of the SA Air Force.  This has resulted in South Africa becoming a life-long partner in one of the most ambitious transport aircraft programmes ever undertaken. South African industry, represented by Denel and Aerosud as level-1 suppliers, have substantial responsibility in design, manufacture and support of every A400M delivered around the world. The South African Air Force will receive its eight aircraft between 2010 and 2012.


In 2005, South Africa signed a contract to acquire eight Airbus A400M airlifters to modernise and enhance the airlift capability of the SA Air Force. This has resulted in South Africa becoming a life-long partner in one of the most ambitious transport aircraft programmes ever undertaken. South African industry, represented by Denel and Aerosud, as level 1 suppliers, have substantial responsibility in design, manufacture and support of every A400M delivered around the world. To date, Airbus Military has received orders for 192 A400M aircraft from nine countries. The first aircraft is scheduled to fly in January 2008 with first deliveries to start in the last quarter of 2009. The South African Air Force will receive its eight aircraft between 2010 and 2012. In June 2006 Denel delivered the first fuselage top-shells (roof sections) to Airbus¹s Bremen, Germany facility where they have since been incorporated into the centre fuselage section of the first aircraft.

In June 2006 Denel delivered the first fuselage top-shells (roof sections) to Airbus’s Bremen, Germany facility where they have since been incorporated into the centre fuselage section of the first aircraft. Pretoria-based Aerosud is another significant South African supplier to Airbus, producing avionics-bay racks, wing components and galleys for the A320 family – the world’s best selling family of single-aisle twin-engined jetliners – and a variety of components for the A400M.
 
Eurocopter


Eurocopter South Africa featured several helicopters in its display area at AAD 2006. This one is identified (on the fuselage) as an EC-145. On the aircraft’s data plates it is stated that the manufacturer is Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH, that the model is an MBB-BK117C-2, that the constructor’s number is 9055, that it was manufactured in 2005 and that the machine is ex 9A-HKA. The aircraft was registered as 9A-HKA on 2005-06-30 and it carried the registration D-HMBO(6) (which was cancelled in 2005). Several aircraft had this D-registration, which appears to be a test marking. The helicopter has Hiko titles (Helikopterska Kompanija, which is a Croatian company).


Eurocopter EC130B4 ZS-OPL is one of several aircraft that were displayed inside. The machine is registered to Pezula Private Estate and has constructor’s number 4042 and the Pezula logo and titles. The Pezula Private Estate is a real-estate development between Knysna’s Eastern Head, the Sinclair Nature Reserve and the Noetzie River on the east coast of the Western Cape of South Africa. The helicopter is available for charter flights through the Pezula Travel Desk.


Some of the helicopters that were used in the Europter display at AAD 2006 arrived on 19 September 2006. Eurocopter EC120B Colibri ZS-RLN has the constructor’s number 1065 and was displayed statically. The machine was manufactured in 1999, has constructor’s number 1065 and is registered to South African National Parks. On 23 August 2005 the helicopter’s main rotor blades collided with trees in the Kruger National Park while it was involved in the capturing of game.


After having arrived on 19 September, this Eurocopter EC135P2 (registered ZS-RXJ) also formed part of the Eurocopter South Africa static display at AAD 2006. According to the data plate on the machine it was manufactured by Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH, has the constructor’s number 0455 and was manufactured in 2006.


Aerospatiale AS350B3 Ecureuil ZS-RZV of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Air Wing (constructor’s number 4031) formed part of the Eurocopter static display by Eurocopter SA. It is interesting to note that Denel Optronics was awarded a contract in August 2006 for the supply of the Goshawk 350 multi-sensor electro-optic and infrared system. The SAPS Air Wing flew the system on one of its helicopters at AAD 2006. A microwave downlink from the SAPS helicopter enabled real-time images to be seen on plasma screens in Hall 5 (Denel) and Hall 7 (SAPS). This virtual “eye in the sky” system will allow the SAPS to deploy their helicopters for day/night crime prevention, law enforcement and border surveillance operations.

Embraer


Embraer displayed an example of the AEW&C version of the EMB145 at AAD 2006. FAB 6700 is an R-99A of the Força Aérea Brasileiria (Brazilian Air Force) that is operated by Unit 2°/6° GAV (from Base Aérea de Anápolis). The colours and markings comprise an overall grey colour scheme with the Brazilian flag as fin flash, the designation R-99A and full serial number on the tailfin, the five-pointed Brazilian-star roundel on the engine nacelle, full titles on the fuselage, a sticker commemorating 100 years of Santos Dumont’s first flight, the unit badge of 2°/6° GAV (name Guardiao) and the last two digits of the serial number on the nose-wheel door. The constructor’s number of the aircraft is possibly 145122, which is ex PP-XSB.


Embraer describes the EMB-145 AEW&C as “the most advanced and affordable Early Warning and Control aircraft available on the market”. The aircraft is based on the ERJ-145 regional jet and carries an Ericsson Erieye radar (a high-performance multimode active phased-array Doppler radar system). The EMB-145 AEW&C is capable of high mission efficiency through quick reaction times and covers wide areas. There is also an onboard command-and-control and advanced data-link suite. The crew members have the advantage of “a state-of-the-art human-machine interface”. The EMB-145 AEW&C forms part of a “successful family of Intelligence, Reconnaissance and Surveillance aircraft and is the only new generation AEW&C System currently available”. (See Embraer’s website and promotional material.)


Embraer’s 190 airliner is depicted here against the background of the Rutanga Junction, which is adjacent to AFB Ysterplaat (ICAO code FAYP), on 21 September 2006 (when the aircraft arrived for participation in AAD 2006). The following information is given on the aircraft’s data plate: ERJ190-100LR and constructor’s number 19000002. Only two airliners were seen at AAD 2006 during the period 19 to 21 September 2006.


The Embraer 190 is one of Embraer’s E-Jets family of aircraft (which consists of the 170, 175, 190 and195) optimised for the 70- to 110-seat segment of the market. It is a 100-seat aircraft that can be configured in a 94-seat dual-class, 98-seat single-class, 100-seat mixed-class or 106-seat single-class layout. The 190 is finished in company colours, with an illustration of the globe and small tailfins depicting E-Jets customers on both sides of the fuselage.


As usual, the various manufacturers of corporate jets (also known as bizjets) vied for the purses of potential customers. This “Battle of the Bizjets” resulted in the products of five manufacturers from various categories being represented at AAD 2006. These included two aircraft by Cessna, one by Dassault, one by Embraer, four by Bombardier and two by Raytheon. In this image Embraer’s Legacy 600 and Bombardier’s (in the background) Global 5000 and Challenger 300 are illustrated. The Legacy 600 is registered PT-SFC, has constructor’s number 14500954 and is identified on its data plate as an EMB-135BJ. PT-SFC arrived on 19 September and was put on static display in the Embraer section of the static park.


During a press conference hosted by Embraer, this model of the EMB-145 AEW&C in South African markings was displayed. The EMB-145 AEW&C would be much cheaper to operate than a full-blown AWACS aircraft. I overheard that about four aircraft would make sense for the South African Air Force.

Execujet
 
Headquartered in Zurich, Switzerland, the ExecuJet Aviation Group is an independently owned global aviation company providing complete private and business air transport solutions.
 
Through associated companies in Australia, Europe, the Middle East and South Africa, ExecuJet offers a comprehensive set of business aviation sales, operations and aftermarket support services world-wide.
 
ExecuJet hosted the static display of four Bombardier business jets: the super-light Learjet 45 and the Learjet 60 as well as the wide-bodied Challenger 300 and Bombardier Global 5000. ExecuJet is Bombardier’s sole distributor and sales representative for Southern Africa of their complete range of business jets and is a Bombardier-approved service centre.
 
The high-speed Bombardier Global 5000 business jet made its debut at the Africa Aerospace & Defence 2006 Exhibition at Ysterplaat Air Force Base on 20 September 2006. Featuring an all-new interior, the aircraft was stopping in Cape Town as part of a 14-day African tour of 16 cities in 13 countries. It was open for viewing on static display until September 23.


On 20 September 2006 the Bombardier Global 5000 business jet made its debut at the Africa Aerospace & Defence 2006 Exhibition. The aircraft stopped in Cape Town as part of a 14-day African tour of 16 cities in 13 countries. The Global 5000’s full name is the Bombardier Global 5000 Model BD7001A11, it has the registration N182GX and its constructor’s number is 9182.
 
The Bombardier Global 5000 jet combines ultimate comfort, superior speed and the most technologically advanced cabin in its class. In service since April 2005, it is capable of executing transcontinental missions at speeds up to Mach 0.89, and can connect routes such as Johannesburg-Geneva in 10 hours, under certain operating conditions. The aircraft boasts the largest cabin in its class with features including unmatched entertainment components and high-speed Internet connectivity as standard equipment, as well as a heads-up flight display system, with the largest field of view of any business aircraft.
Bombardier is represented in the region by ExecuJet South Africa, the continent’s leading supplier of business aviation solutions. Based at Lanseria International Airport, near Johannesburg, and at Cape Town International Airport, ExecuJet South Africa is the exclusive sales representative for the entire family of Bombardier business jets in several Southern African countries including South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and the Indian Ocean islands. In this capacity, ExecuJet has assisted Bombardier in selling and delivering nearly half of all the business jets sold into the region since 1992.


The Bombardier Challenger 300 is described as “the definitive, super-midsize corporate jet, developed to satisfy customer needs unmet by any other aircraft… (and is) “a sophisticated, high-performance business jet” (see the Bombardier website). On the data plate of this particular aircraft (registered ZS-ACT) the manufacturer is given as Bombardier Aerospace, Bombardier Inc. Montreal Canada, the model number is described as BD-100 and the constructor’s number is reflected as 20034.


ZS-GSG, the first Learjet 60 in South Africa, arrived on 21 September and gave a very spirited flying display before landing and being used for photo sessions on the ground. Subsequently it was used for static display by Execujet. On the aircraft’s data plate it is mentioned that the machine was manufactured by Learjet Inc (which is a division of Bombardier), that it is a Model 60 and that the constructor’s number is 301.


The very clean lines of the Learjet are evident in this photograph. The improved Learjet 60 flew in its basic, definitive form as early as June 1991. The Lear 60 is described as a mid-size, high-speed bizjet. The latest model, as reflected on the Bombardier website, is the Learjet 60 XR. 


According to the Bombardier website the Learjet is a light to midsize business jet and the latest model of the Lear 45 is the Learjet 45 XR. This specific aircraft has the South African registration ZS-PTL and was seen for the first time on 19 September on the flight line at FAYP. At AAD 2006 the aircraft was displayed statically by Execujet. The following information appear on the data plate: Learjet Inc, Model 45 and constructor’s number 181. The machine has the ExecuJet Aviation Group titles and logo on the tailfin.

Executive Helicopters


None of the Executive Helicopters aircraft seen at AAD 2006 had distinct registration letters on them. Executive Helicopters is involved in the complete spectrum of the helicopter business including sales, maintenance and charter (government, tourist, corporate, aerial support and filming services). The company's main focus is the Bell 204 and 205 series as well as the military variant (the UH-1), as these helicopters are perfectly suited to the African operating environment with their 10- to 15-seat or some 1.5- to 2-ton-carrying capacity and ease of maintenance. Helicopters in the fleet include ZU-CVC (of the Huey Club), which is used to give people the experience of flying in a Vietnam-vintage helicopter as well as the Super Frelon. The Bell 204/205/UH-1H is perfectly suited to disaster relief support with a large flat floor area capable of carrying up to 1.5 or 2 tons depending upon the mission requirement.

Falco Aviation


Falco Aviation exhibited this Mushshak at AAD 2006. The Mushshak is manufactured by the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Pakistan Aeronautical Complex) in Pakistan and the South African distributor of the aircraft is Falco Aviation and Leasing CC of Wonderboom Airport in Pretoria. Previously a Mushshak was exhibited at AAD in 2002. The aircraft had Falco Aviation, Mushshak and Blue Chip Aviation/Flying School titles (it is used as an ab initio and advanced trainer by the flying school).

Micro Wings


Here Micro Wings Cubby ZU-DTR is seen on the flight line on 19 September 2006. The Cubby is 75% the size of the original Piper J-3 Cub and the idea with the aircraft is to make flying affordable. Micro Wings was originally started in 2001 by Kobus van Staden and Adam Nagorski (as Cubby Wings).

Mooney of South Africa


This is Mooney M20M Bravo GX construction number 27-0352 and it was registered ZS-ZAR on 20 February 2006.

NAC


NAC displayed a variety of aircraft at AAD 2006, including Hawker 850XP A6-ELC. The aircraft was built by the Raytheon Aircraft Company of Wichita, Kansas, its constructor’s number is 258781 and it is ex N37261. The certificate for N37261 was issued on 2006-06-22 and the aircraft was subsequently exported to the United Arab Emirates (cancellation date 2006-06-29).


Raytheon Premier I ZS-ABG also formed part of NAC’s static display at AAD 2006. The aircraft is registered to Abalengani Aviation (note the Abalengani titles on the tailfin). According to the data plate the aircraft was manufactured by the Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA, it is a model 390 and its constructor’s number is RB-70.


NAC’s wide variety of display aircraft included this Diamond Aircraft model DA42 Twin Star. Information reflected on the data plate includes the manufacturer (Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH), registration (ZS-DIA) and constructor’s number (42.166).


This Robinson R44 Raven II (registration ZS-OID and constructor’s number 11248) formed part of the large number of aircraft put on static display by NAC.


ZS-OKP is a late-model Beechcraft Bonanza (a G36) and formed part of NAC’s section of the static park at AAD 2006. Examination of the data plate on the aircraft revealed that it was manufactured by Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA and that it has the constructor’s number E-3684.


Several helicopters were exhibited at AAD 2006, including Bell 407 ZS-RZG, which was statically displayed by NAC. Information on the data plate include the manufacturer (Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Ltd., Mirabel, Canada), constructor’s number (53662), the date manufactured (September 2005) and the engine type (250-C47B).


Aircraft from various manufacturers featured in the NAC display area. ZS-TGM is from the Raytheon stable and is a Beechcraft King Air B200. Useful information appearing on the data plate include details about the manufacturer (Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA) and the constructor’s number (BB-1938).


Tecnam P2002 Sierra (manufactured by Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam) ZU-ECK appeared in the NAC static-display area as well.  The aircraft was registered on 9 February 2006 to National Airways Corporation and has the constructor's number 149.

Other aerial vehicles


ZS-HRL is an Enstrom 280C constructor’s number 1116 and it was manufactured in 1977. The aircraft was involved in two incidents. On 20 May 2003 it was substantially damaged when the helicopter struck telephone wires during an attempted precautionary landing near Witbank Airfield and suffered a tail strike on 18 March 2006 near Krugersdorp during a precautionary landing. The machine was registered ZS-HRL  Enstrom 280C Shark on 13 September 1989 and is ex N51694, which was cancelled on 6 January 1989.


Cessna 500 Citation I SP ZS-LDV has constructor’s number 500-0418 and is ex N2628B. It arrived on 19 September and was seen on 20 September on the flight line.


Eurocopter AS350B Ecureuil ZS-RXG constructor’s number 3332 was built in 2000 and had the previous identities F-WQDD (probably a test registration), HB-ZCI (registered 21 November 2000 and cancelled 30 November 2001) and F-GZJP (registered 30 November 2001 and cancelled 30 August 2005) before becoming ZS-RXG on 4 January 2006, the owner being the SA Red Cross Air Mercy Service.


Aero Vodochody L-39C Albatros ZU-TEE has the constructor’s number 232150, was built in 1982 and was registered on 29 April 2005. It is seen here on 21 September.

Paramount Group




One of the more unusual aircraft at AAD 2006 was this Seabird Aviation Seeker, which was displayed by the Paramount Group. According to the dataplate on the aircraft it was manufactured by Seabird Aviation Jordan LLC, it is a model SB7L-360A, the constructor’s number is SAJ06001 and it was manufactured in March 2006. The registration of the aircraft is JY-SE1.

Pilatus Aircraft


The Pilatus PC12 is ideal for use on unprepared airfields. Nothing currently available matches the versatility of the Pilatus PC12. The Swiss-built aircraft integrates a single turboprop engine into an aerodynamically advanced airframe, and provides executive-level transportation in spacious, pressurized cabin comfort. The aircraft is ideally suited for “special mission” aviation offerings, such as medical evacuation.

Placo


According to the data plate on ZS-OUF it was manufactured by the New Piper Aircraft, Inc. Vero Beach, Florida, it has constructor’s number 3232061 and it is a model PA-32-301FT. It formed part of the Placo static display.


The data plate of Progress Flight Academy’s Piper Warrior III ZS-OVY states that the machine was manufactured by the New Piper Aircraft, Inc. Vero Beach, Florida, as well as that the aircraft has the constructor’s number 2842156 and is a model PA-28-161. The Warrior arrived on 19 September and was put on static display by Placo.


The Placo static display included Piper PA-44-180 Seminole ZS-PGI of Progress Flight Academy. The aircraft was registered on either 6 or 7 September 2005 to the academy and was manufactured in 2005. Its constructor’s number is 4496210.

Robin Coss Aviation


Vans Aircraft/Coss R RV-10 was registered on 16 November 2005 and manufactured in 2006 The aircraft’s constructor’s number is 102.


Rotorway Executive 162F has the constructor’s number 6932 and was manufactured in 2005. Its registration date is 26 April 2006.


This Supermarine (PL) -Australia Mk 26 Spitfire was assembled by Robin Coss Aviation. It arrived on 21 September. The machine has an RAF scheme and the code letters ZP-A.
 
SAAF
 
AAD having taken place at a SAAF base for several years now, there is usually a large presence of SAAF aircraft, albeit not all part of the main AAD display.
 
Several support aircraft were seen during the period 19 to 21 September. These included three C-47TPs of 35 Squadron (6839, 6840 and 6877) that were transporting cargo and people and were possibly involved in a shuttle service between Cape Town and Pretoria. Two 21 Squadron VIP aircraft were also noticed, namely Falcon 900 ZS-CAQ and Cessna Citation ZS-MLN. Another support aircraft was CN235M number 8026 of 44 Squadron, which (arrived and departed on 21 September).


6839


6839 and 6840: The new and the old. Recently some C-47TPs have been seen van a new overall dark grey colour scheme. Here the difference between the new scheme and the old standard scheme of lowviz two-tone blue upper surfaces is clearly illustrated.

6840: A C-47TP of 35 Squadron, SAAF; faded two-tone-blue camo with black anti-glare panel and nose radome; unit badge in colour; last two digits of serial number on nose and rear fuselage; transport version; seen 20 and 21 September on flight line.


Falcon 50


Cessna Citation


CN235M, 44 Squadron SAAF: Dark earth and dark green camo with flag, 9-point star and unit badge (starboard side only); arrived and departed on 21 September.


This image primarily illustrates some of the SAAF aircraft that were seen during the period 19 to 21 September 2006. From left to right:  Shackleton 1722, C-47TP 6877, Falcon 50 ZS-CAQ, Citation ZS-LDV, Cheetah C 359 and C-47TP 6840.

6877: C-47TP of 35 Squadron, SAAF; new-style grey overall with flag, 9-point star and unit badge (lowviz); last two digits on rear fuselage and nose; black anti-glare panel and nose radome; transport version; seen 20 September on flight line.

Aircraft that were on display included the first Gripen D (new lowviz markings) and an Atlas Cheetah C of 2 Squadron, Agusta A109LUH numbers 4013 and 4006 (both no unit badge), a 16 Squadron Rooivalk (which formed part of the Denel static display), Oryx 1224 of 17 Squadron (on static display in wash bay next to AAD 2006 registration area) and Oryx 1202 of 22 Squadron (the latter on the flight line), Cessna 185 number 747 of 44 Squadron (red-and-white civilian colour scheme), BAE Hawk Mk 120 numbers 256 and 261 of 85 Combat Flying School (static-display area as well as flying), Pilatus PC-7 Mk IIs (Atlas Astra) numbers 2018, 2023, 2024, 2036 of the Central Flying School and Wasp 91, Super Frelon 314, Albatross 881, Shackleton 1722 and Dakotas 6832 and 6859 of the SAAF Museum.

Saab Gripen D 392801 took part in the flying display. Here are several images of the aircraft illustrating various views and details.







The first A 109 Light Utility Helicopter assembled for the SAAF by Denel made its successful first flight on September 1st, 2004. The collaborative program, which is designed to strengthen South Africa’s aerospace industry, foresees the assembly of five SAAF helicopters in Italy and 25 in South Africa. Besides Denel, a number of other South African manufacturers have partnered AgustaWestland on the SAAF re-equipment program.


AgustaWestland is the supplier of 30 new Light Utility Helicopters to the South African Air Force and four specialised maritime helicopters of the latest Super Lynx 300 type. The aircraft, which are currently being taken into service and have already proved their versatility in a variety of roles from search and rescue via forward observation to VIP transport, replace the SAAF’s ageing fleet of Alouette III helicopters, many of which were first brought into service 40 years ago.



Agusta A109 LUH SAAF: Dark earth, dark green and light earth camo; serial number in full on fuselage and last two digits on nose; flag, 9-point star.


Atlas Oryx 17 Squadron, SAAF When initially seen, all-white without titles, but later United Nations and UN titles (both sides) applied in black; unit badge below cockpit (both sides), black anti-soot panel behind engine, grey tail-rotor blades, serial number in full in black on tail boom and on nose; on static display in wash bay next to registration area


Cessna 185 44 Squadron, SAAF Red-and-white civilian colour scheme, black anti-glare panel and red spinner, unit badge below cockpit on forward fuselage; flying.


BAE Hawk Mk 120 256 of 85 Combat Flying School, SAAF: 9-point star (fuselage and wings), flag, 2-tone grey camo, full serial on rear fuselage, last two digits repeated on nose; static-display area as well as flying.


256


BAE Hawk Mk 120 261 of 85 Combat Flying School, SAAF: 9-point star (fuselage and wings), flag, 2-tone grey camo, full serial on rear fuselage, last two digits repeated on nose; static-display area as well as flying.


Atlas Astra 2018 of the Central Flying School, SAAF: Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; flying.


Atlas Astra of the Central Flying School, SAAF: Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; flying.


2036


Atlas Astra 2023 (foreground) of the Central Flying School, SAAF: Silver Falcon 1; standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Maj Alex van Oostveen, white 1 on tailfin.

SAAF Museum


1722 Avro Shackleton Mk III SAAF Museum Grey-and-white maritime scheme, old flag, Springbok Castle, code letter P (yellow); due to fly on public days.


This is Dakota 6832 of the SAAF Museum. Some areas are stripped of paint; some areas camo; light-blue patches on engine nacelles; some areas silver with black serial number and black code letters OD-K (as used by 28 Squadron after World War II) and old-style flag; part of youth display.


Dakota 6859 is finished in the old-style camouflage pattern, with the Springbok Castle, but only the last two digiits of the serial number appear on the nose.
 
Thunder City
 
Four supersonic English Electric Lightnings featured in a spectacular formation display. The fourth Lightning, Royal Air Force serial number XP693, also made its public debut in South Africa. That aircraft, the last flyable English Electric Lightning supersonic interceptor, recently underwent a four-year complete restoration.
 

ZU-BBD English Electric Lightning T.5 Black; ZU-BEW English Electric Lightning F.6; ZU-BEX English Electric Lightning T.5 Silver; ZU-BEY English Electric Lightning F.6 Silver; XP693; British flaf and RAF roundel.

Various (groups of) aircraft


Africa Aerospace and Defence 2006 (AAD 2006) took place from 20 to 24 September 2006 at Air Force Base (AFB) Ysterplaat (ICAO code FAYP). 20 to 22 September were trade days while 23 and 24 September were public days. Civil as well as military aircraft were seen at FAYP during the period 19 to 21 September 2006. In this view Enstrom ZS-OER, K-8 Karakorums 2106G and 2104E as well as CASA Aviocar 800 can be seen from left to right. The helicopter was put on display by Comair at AAD 2006. The latter three aircraft are operated by the Air Force of Zimbabwe, but only the K-8s flew. 


Table Mountain forms a beautiful backdrop to this interesting array of military aircraft. Visible from left to right are an R-99A of the Brazilian Air Force, four Astras of the SAAF’s Central Flying School and two Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin warbirds of the Sasol Tigers. The AEW&C145 is known as the R-99A in the Brazilian Air Force and was displayed statically at AAD 2006 by Embraer. The registrations of the two Delfins are ZU-AUX and ZU-CYI.


This image was taken on 19 September 2006 and shows Cessna 500 Citation ZS-LDV arriving. The aircraft was also seen on the flight line on 20 September. The tails of the following aircraft are visible (from left to right): Avro Shackleton 1722 of the SAAF Museum, Dakota 6859 of the SAAF Museum and Cessna Grand Caravan 3011 of 41 Squadron SAAF. The Shackleton and Dakota were due to fly during the public days. (The Grand Caravan also possibly flew during the public days.)


This photograph, taken on 21 September, illustrates part of the static display area. Visible are Piper 6X ZS-OUF (front), Piper Warrior ZS-OVY (second row, left) and Piper Seminole ZS-PGI (second row, right) (all Placo display). In addition Beech Super King Air ZS-TGM (back, NAC display) can be seen.


No less than 13 aircraft can be distinguished in this shot of the busy flight line at Ysterplaat! The photo, which was taken on 21 September 2006, illustrates the types of aircraft that could be seen each day from 19 to 21 September 2006 at Ysterplaat (ICAO code FAYP). The aircraft are (in the background, from back to front, and in the foreground, from left to right): Eurocopter EC145 D-HMBA; Zimbawean Air Force K-8 Karakorums 2106G and 2104E and Aviocar 800; SAAF Shackleton 1722 (Museum), CN235M 8026 (44 Squadron), Hawks 261 and 256 (85 Combat Flying School), Cheetah C 359 (2 Squadron) and C-47TPs 6839 and 6840 (35 Squadron); as well as Sasol Tigers Delfins ZU-CYI and  ZU-AUX. The EC145, both Karakorums and both Hawks flew several times. Several SAAF aircraft undertook transport flights to and from FAYP – these included the CN235M and the two C-47TPs (6839 is painted in the new-style grey overall finish and was seen on 19 and 21 September 2006, while 6840 is finished in the standard two-tone-blue camouflage scheme – previous standard scheme). The Sasol Tigers arrived on the 21st.

Other exhibitors
 
Other exhibitors included Aero Vodochody, Aerosud Holdings, Armscor, Brahmos, Lanseria International Airport, Pipistrel SA, Reutech, Rosoboronexport, Sennheiser, Starlite Aviation and the Test Flying Academy of South Africa.
 
SOURCES
 
Africa Aerospace and Defence Official Catalogue 2006
Avdata (South African Civil Register; note that the SACAA now performs this function)
Various media releases (AgustaWestland, Airbus, BAE Systems, Denel)
Brochures and flyers provided by various companies (AirQuarius)
The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)


DETAILED LIST OF CIVILIAN AIRCRAFT AND EXHIBITORS SEEN AT AFB YSTERPLAAT FROM 19 TO 21 SEPTEMBER 2006
 
 
SERIAL/
REGGIE
TYPE UNIT/
AIRLINE/
COMPANY
REMARKS
       
A6-ELC Hawker 850XP   Data plate: Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, Kansas; constructor’s number 258781, ex N37261 (certificate issued 2006-06-22), exported to United Arab Emirates (cancellation date 2006-06-29); NAC static display
D-HMBA Eurocopter EC-145 Hiko titles Data plate: Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH, MBB-BK117C-2, constructor’s number 9055, manufactured in 2005, ex 9A-HKA (registered 9A-HKA 2005-06-30), D-HMBO(6) (cancelled 2005); several aircraft had this D-registration, appears to be a test marking; Hiko titles (HIKO - Helikopterska Kompanija, Croatia); part of Eurocopter static display
F-GSMT Falcon 900EX   Falcon 900EX EASy; constructor’s number 155; Dassault static display
N182GX Bombardier Global 5000   Model BD7001A11; constructor’s number 9182; arrived 20 September, put on static display by Execujet
N208AZ Cessna 208B  Grand Caravan   constructor’s number 208B1175, registered to Cessna; Comair static display
N302CJ Cessna 525A Citation CJ2+   constructor’s number 525A0302; Comair static display
N927LT Cessna 680 Citation Sovereign   Data plate: Cessna 680, constructor’s number 680-0070; Comair static display
PP-XMB Embraer 190 Embraer Data plate: ERJ190-100LR, constructor’s number 19000002; company colours, illustration of globe on both sides of fuselage with small tailfins depicting various airlines; Embraer static display
PT-SFC Embraer Legacy 600   constructor’s number EMB135BJ, 14500954; arrived 19 September, put on Embraer static display
ZS-ABG Raytheon Premier I Abalengani Aviation Data plate: manufactured by Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA, model 390, constructor’s number RB-70; Abalengani titles on tailfin; static display by NAC
ZS-ACT Bombardier Challenger 300   Data plate: Bombardier Aerospace, Bombardier Inc. Montreal Canada, model BD-100, constructor’s number 20034; static display by Execujet
ZS-AVH Pilatus PC-12/47   Summerfields logo and titles on tailfin and below cockpit; constructor’s number 713; Pilatus static display
ZS-CAQ Falcon 900 21 Squadron, SAAF Corporate colours with name Nong, unit badge (port side only), flag, full titles and national Coat of Arms; seen 20 September (departed same date)
ZS-DIA Diamond Aircraft model DA42 Twin Star   Data plate: Diamond Aircraft Industries GmbH, constructor’s number 42.166; static display by NAC
ZS-EOS AgustaWestland AW139   Static display by AgustaWestland
ZS-GSG Learjet 60   Data plate: Learjet Inc, Model 60, constructor’s number 301; arrived 21 September, put on static display by Execujet
ZS-HMD Agusta A109 Grand   Part of AgustaWestland display in hall
ZS-HRL Enstrom 280C   Flight line
ZS-JAV Fokker F-28-4000 AirQuarius Arrived 19 September, subsequently put on static display; AirQuarius titles on fuselage and Executive Avionic Solutions titles and logo on tailfin; name Bella-Donna; full reggie on empennage and nose-wheel door
ZS-LDV Cessna 500 Citation   Arrived on 19 September and seen 20 September on flight line
ZS-MJP Cessna 182T Skylane   Data plate: manufactured by Cessna Aircraft Company Wichita Kansas, constructor’s number 182T81753; Comair static display
ZS-MLN Cessna Citation II 21 Squadron, SAAF Corporate colours with flag, full titles and national Coat of Arms; seen 19 September (departed same date); ex ZS-MLN, VDF-030 of Venda Defence Force (Venda is one of the former South African homelands)
ZS-OER Enstrom 280FX   Data plate: manufactured by Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Menominee Michigan, constructor’s number 2121, date manufactured 22 February 2006; Comair static display
ZS-OID Robinson R44 Raven II   Static display by NAC
ZS-OKP Beechcraft Bonanza G36   Data plate: manufactured by Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA constructor’s number E-3684; static display
ZS-OKR Aircraft Manufacturing Company Mushshak Falco Aviation/Blue Chip Aviation Flying School Static display by Falco Aviation
ZS-OPL Eurocopter EC130B4 Pezula Private Estate Constructor’s number 4042; displayed in hall; Pezula logo and titles
ZS-OUF Piper 6X   Data plate: manufactured by the New Piper Aircraft, Inc. Vero Beach, Florida constructor’s number 3232061, model PA-32-301FT; static display by Placo
ZS-OVY Piper Warrior III Progress Flight Academy Data plate: manufactured by the New Piper Aircraft, Inc. Vero Beach, Florida constructor’s number 2842156, model PA-28-161; arrived 19 September, static display by Placo
ZS-PGI Piper PA-44-180 Seminole Progress Flight Academy Part of Placo static display
ZS-PRU Gippsland GA-8 Airvan Airvan Africa Data plate: Gippsland Aeronautics Pty. Ltd. Latrobe Regional Airport, Morwell Vic. 3840 Australia, constructor’s number GA8-08-053; all-white with Australian flag on tailfin and Airvan titles and reggie in black; static display
ZS-PTL Learjet 45   Data plate: Learjet Inc, Model 45, constructor’s number 181; 19 September seen on flight line, subsequently put on static display by Execujet; ExecuJet Aviation Group titles and logo on tailfin
ZS-RLN Eurocopter EC120B   Constructor’s number 1065; arrived 19 September, subsequently part of Eurocopter static display
ZS-RXC Enstrom 480B   Data plate: manufactured by Enstrom Helicopter Corporation Menominee Michigan, constructor’s number 5078, date manufactured 30 March 2005; static display by Comair
ZS-RXG     Metro West Cape Rescue; AMS; flight line
ZS-RXJ Eurocopter EC135P2   Data plate: Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH, constructor’s number 0455, manufactured in 2006; arrived 19 September, subsequently part of Eurocopter static display by Eurocopter SA
ZS-RZG Bell 407   Data plate: Bell Helicopter Textron Canada Ltd., Mirabel, Canada; constructor’s number 53662; manufactured September 2005; engine 250-C47B; NAC static display
ZS-RZV Aerospatiale AS350B3 Ecureuil South African Police Service Air Wing Constructor’s number 4031; part of Eurocopter SA static display
ZS-TGM Beechcraft King Air B200   Data plate: manufactured by Raytheon Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS USA constructor’s number BB-1938; static display by NAC
ZS-ZAR Mooney Bravo GX   Data plate: Mooney Airplane Company, Inc. Kerrville, Texas; model M20M; constructor’s number 27-0352; static display by Mooney of SA
ZU-AUX Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin Sasol Tigers White 55; arrived 21 September; flying
ZU-AYS Harvard Flying Lions Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos; static display and flying
ZU-BET Harvard Flying Lions Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos; static display and flying
ZU-BEU Harvard Flying Lions Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos; static display and flying
ZU-BMC Harvard Flying Lions Academy Brushware and Castrol Aviator titles and logos; static display and flying
ZU-BBD English Electric Lightning T.5 Thunder City Black; flying
ZU-BEW English Electric Lightning F.6 Thunder City Flying
ZU-BEX English Electric Lightning T.5 Thunder City Silver; flying
ZU-BEY English Electric Lightning F.6 Thunder City Silver; XP693; British flag and RAF roundel; flying
ZU-BOI ATE Super Hind Mk III ATE Static display and flying; overall dark grey with flag and gold reggie
ZU-CYH Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin Sasol Tigers White 112; arrived 21 September; flying
ZU-CYI Aero Vodochody L-29 Delfin Sasol Tigers White 97; arrived 21 September; flying; the aircraft in which Martin van Straaten lost his life
ZU-DIX Vans RV-10   Static display by Robin Coss Aviation
ZU-DTR Microwings Cubby   Seen 19 September on flight line
ZU-DZO Rotorway Executive   Static display by Robin Coss Aviation
ZU-EAR Vans RV-7   Static display by Robin Coss Aviation
ZU-ECK Tecnam P2002 Sierra   Costruzioni Aeronautiche Tecnam; static display by NAC
ZU-TEE Aero Vodochody L-39 Albatros   Flight line; black
ZU-ZPA Supermarine (PL) -Australia Mk 26 Spitfire   Arrived 21 September; RAF scheme, code letters ZP-A
 
 
DETAILED LIST OF MILITARY AIRCRAFT SEEN AT  AFB YSTERPLAAT FROM 19 TO 21 SEPTEMBER2006
 
 
 
SERIAL/
REGGIE
TYPE UNIT/
AIRLINE/
COMPANY
REMARKS
       
01 SAAB Gripen D 2 Squadron, SAAF Lowviz 2-tone grey camo scheme with lowviz markings (flag, unit badge and 9-point star); constructor’s number 392801; twoseater; being tested by TFDC; special display on media day; displayed by BAE Systems
93 Westland Wasp SAAF Museum Grey with Springbok Castle and badge of President Pretorius on nose; static-display area close to one of public entrances
256 BAE Hawk Mk 120 85 Combat Flying School, SAAF 9-point star (fuselage and wings), flag, 2-tone grey camo, full serial on rear fuselage, last two digits repeated on nose; static-display area as well as flying
261 BAE Hawk Mk 120 85 Combat Flying School, SAAF 9-point star (fuselage and wings), flag, 2-tone grey camo, full serial on rear fuselage, last two digits repeated on nose; static-display area as well as flying
263 BAE Hawk Mk 120 85 Combat Flying School, SAAF 9-point star, flag, 2-tone grey camo, full serial on rear fuselage, last two digits repeated on nose; static display in ATE enclosure
314 Aerospatiale SA321 Super Frelon SAAF Museum Dark green/earth camo; 15 Squadron badge on nose; serial number on tail boom and bottom of nose; static-display area close to one of public entrances
359 Atlas Cheetah C 2 Squadron, SAAF Unit badge, 9-point star; flight line
460 Atlas Impala Mk I SAAF Museum Standard silver training scheme, old flag and Springbok Castle; the SAAF’s first Impala; grass area next to flight line
680 Denel Rooivalk 16 Squadron, SAAF Camo, flag, 9-point star, unit badge on both sides, serial number in full on front and rear of fuselage; put on static display from 21 September 2006 outside Denel hall
747 Cessna 185 44 Squadron, SAAF Red-and-white civilian colour scheme, black anti-glare panel and red spinner, unit badge below cockpit on forward fuselage; flying
800 CASA 212-200 Aviocar 3 Squadron, Air Force of Zimbabwe Dark earth and dark green camo scheme with cream under surfaces, Zimbabwean bird (on starboard side of tailfin), Zimbabwean flag (on port side of tailfin) and roundel (on rear fuselage, both sides); no unit badge; constructor’s number A45-1-288; support aircraft for K-8s, arrived 0n 2006-09-19, stayed on flight line
896 Piaggio P166S Albatross SAAF Museum Grey-and-white maritime scheme, black nose, blue cheat line top of fuselage, old flag, Springbok Castle, 27 Squadron badge; static-display area close to one of public entrances
1202 Atlas Oryx 22 Squadron, SAAF Dark earth and dark green camo, flag on tail boom, unit badge below cockpit; maritime version; grass area next to flight line
1224 Atlas Oryx 17 Squadron, SAAF When initially seen, all-white without titles, but later United Nations and UN titles (both sides) applied in black; unit badge below cockpit (both sides), black anti-soot panel behind engine, grey tail-rotor blades, serial number in full in black on tail boom and on nose; on static display in wash bay next to registration area
1235 Atlas Oryx 22 Squadron, SAAF Dark earth and dark green camo, flag on tail boom, unit badge below cockpit; maritime version; flying
1722 Avro Shackleton Mk III SAAF Museum Grey-and-white maritime scheme, old flag, Springbok Castle, code letter P (yellow); due to fly on public days
2018 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; flying
2023 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF, Silver Falcon 1 Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Maj Alex van Oostveen, white 1 on tailfin; flying
2024 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF, Silver Falcon 1 Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Capt Vaughn Gryffenberg, white 1 on tailfin; flying
2025 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF, Silver Falcon 4 Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Capt Scott Ternent, white 4 on tailfin; static display in ATE enclosure
2027 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF, Silver Falcon 4 Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Capt Scott Ternent, white 4 on tailfin; flying
2028 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF, Silver Falcon 2 Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; Capt Vaughn Gryffenberg, white 2 on tailfin; flying
2036 Atlas Astra Central Flying School, SAAF Standard red-and-white training scheme with black anti-glare panel, 9-point star, flag; flying
2104E K-8 Karakorum 2 Squadron, Air Force of Zimbabwe Sand and light-green camo, Zimbabwean bird (port side of tailfin), Zimbabwean roundel, serial number in full on tailfin (last two digits repeated below cockpit), off-white under surfaces, Zimbabwean flag on port side of tailfin; flying
2106G K-8 Karakorum 2 Squadron, Air Force of Zimbabwe Sand and light-green camo, Zimbabwean bird (port side of tailfin), Zimbabwean roundel, serial number in full on tailfin (last two digits repeated below cockpit), off-white under surfaces, Zimbabwean flag on port side of tailfin; flying
3011 Cessna Grand Caravan 41 Squadron, SAAF Corporate colours with black anti-glare panel, unit badge, 9-point star, flag; flying
4006 Agusta A109 LUH SAAF Dark earth, dark green and light earth camo; serial number in full on fuselage and last two digits on nose; part of AgustaWestland static display in hall
4013 Agusta A109 LUH SAAF Dark earth, dark green and light earth camo; serial number in full on fuselage and last two digits on nose; flag, 9-point star; flying
6832 Dakota SAAF Museum Some areas stripped of paint; some areas camo; light-blue patches on engine nacelles; some areas silver with black serial number and black code letters OD-K (as used by 28 Squadron post World War II) and old-style flag; part of youth display
6839 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF New-style grey overall with flag, 9-point star and unit badge (lowviz); last two digits on rear fuselage and nose; black anti-glare panel and nose radome; seen 19 and 21 September on flight line
6840 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF Faded two-tone-blue camo with black anti-glare panel and nose radome; unit badge in colour; last two digits of serial number on nose and rear fuselage; transport version; seen 20 and 21 September on flight line
6854 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF Faded two-tone-blue camo with black anti-glare panel and nose radome; unit badge in colour; last two digits of serial number on rear fuselage; Eagle Castle; possibly maritime version; seen inside grass area next to flight line
6859 Dakota SAAF Museum Dark earth, dark green camo; Springbok Castle; last two digits of serial number on nose; due to fly on public days
6875 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF Corporate colours with unit badge in colour, last two digits of serial in white on rear fuselage and SAAF 80 symbol on tailfin; seen inside grass area next to flight line
6877 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF New-style grey overall with flag, 9-point star and unit badge (lowviz); last two digits on rear fuselage and nose; black anti-glare panel and nose radome; transport version (target tug); seen 20 September on flight line
6887 C-47TP 35 Squadron, SAAF two-tone-blue camo with black anti-glare panel and nose radome; flag, but no unit badge; last two digits on rear fuselage; seen inside grass area next to flight line
7231 Harvard SAAF Museum Dayglo training scheme with old flag and Springbok Castle; grass area next to flight line
7293 Harvard SAAF Museum Dayglo training scheme with old flag and Springbok Castle; grass area next to flight line
8011 CASA 212-200 44 Squadron, SAAF Lowviz grey scheme with unit badge, 9-point star and flag; serial number in full on fillet ahead of tailfin and last two digits repeated above cockpit; taxying towards runway on 19 September
8026 CN235M 44 Squadron, SAAF Dark earth and dark green camo with flag, 9-point star and unit badge (starboard side only); arrived and departed on 21 September
FAB 6700 Embraer EMB145 AEW&C Unit 2°/6° GAV of the Força Aérea Brasileiria, from Base Aérea de Anápolis Overall grey scheme; fin flash = Brazilian flag, designation R-99A and full serial number on tailfin; 5-pointed star on engine nacelle; full titles on fuselage; sticker commemorating 100 years of Santos Dumont’s first flight; unit badge of 2°/6° GAV (name Guardiao); last two digits on nose-wheel door; possibly ex PP-XSB constructor’s number 145122); static display and demo flight by Embraer
JY-SE 1 Seabird Aviation Seeker   Dataplate: manufactured by Seabird Aviation Jordan LLC, model SB7L-360A, constructor’s number SAJ06001, date March 2006; displayed by the Paramount Group
 
 
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